Jonathan Poritsky

Review: Pineapple Express

It had to hap­pen some­time. As much as I had hoped to stave it off for as long as pos­si­ble, the day had to come when I would leave a Judd Apatow pro­duc­tion utterly dis­sat­is­fied. “Forgetting Sarah Marshall” nearly did me in, but fur­ther rumi­na­tion on the film showed a real mat­u­ra­tion hap­pen­ing in the cabal of dirty lit­tle boys that sur­round the Hollywood com­edy mag­nate. Too bad that the pro­gres­sion toward a bet­ter kind of toi­let humor didn’t make it’s way into the teams lat­est, and arguably most antic­i­pated, “Pineapple Express”.
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Review: The Dark Knight

A sky­line, a seething film score, and an explo­sion in a win­dow set the pace for the thrill ride that is “The Dark Knight”. As has become the norm for epic block­busters, Christopher Nolan’s lat­est re-visioning of the Batman saga for­goes open­ing cred­its in an effort to throw us right into the mad­ness of a dete­ri­o­rat­ing Gotham City. As I sat there in a dark­ened the­ater lis­ten­ing to the low growl of Hans Zimmer and James Newton Howard’s score, my heart ached in antic­i­pa­tion for what­ever would come next as I repo­si­tioned squarely to the edge of my seat. Good thing, because noth­ing pre­pared me for what I would go through for the next 160 min­utes.
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Review: Hancock

The world of fic­tion is nei­ther lack­ing dis­en­fran­chised anti-heroes nor tongue-in-cheek smashi­ness, yet “Hancock” stands in sharp relief against the back­drop of love affair with all-powerful beings. For one, it grace­fully shies away from tak­ing itself too seri­ously with­out los­ing it’s foot­ing in real­ity, a feat that was mud­dled on oppo­site ends of the spec­trum in recent block­busters such as “Spiderman” and “The Incredible Hulk”. Even more impres­sive is the fact that inter­na­tional super­star Will Smith is kept at bay, fit­ting into the story nicely rather than hav­ing it built around him. No doubt, he steals the show deliv­er­ing his trade­mark wit with a new-found bit­ter after­taste, but the real star here is the steady hand of direc­tor Peter Berg. Read on…

Review: Wall•E

Wall-E

In the past I have driz­zled praise all over Pixar, specif­i­cally the fantasy-realist films that Brad Bird has made with them. There are many rea­sons to heap lau­rels on the Disney-owned ani­ma­tion stu­dio: its inno­va­tion in the field of com­puter ani­ma­tion before such a thing even existed, its cre­ative use of all avail­able tools at any given point in their his­tory, its abil­ity to cap­ti­vate the minds and pocket books of chil­dren and adults alike. “Wall•E”, how­ever, is some­thing dif­fer­ent, some­thing more than any of us thought these imag­i­neers were capa­ble of.
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